Culture Collections

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Bacteria Collection: Escherichia coli

NCTC Number: NCTC 7921
Current Name: Escherichia coli
Original Strain Reference: 2214
Other Collection No: TYPE 1; 2214
Previous Catalogue Name: Escherichia dispar
Type Strain: No
Family: Enterobacteriaceae
Hazard Group (ACDP): 2
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Antigenic Properties: serovar o4:k:h-
Conditions for growth on solid media: Nutrient agar, 24-48 hours, 37°C, aerobic
Conditions for growth on liquid media: nutrient broth,37, facultative anaerobe
Whole Genome Sequence: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/ERS744794
Annotated Genome: ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/project/pathogens/NCTC3000/d...
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AF192339|TYPE 1|Moraxella catarrhalis type 1 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partialsequence.| agtagagtttgatca... >gb|X77122|LMG 8819| TYPE 1|R.leguminosarum (LMG 8819) 16S rRNA gene.| aacgaacgctggcgg... >gb|AF451296|TURTLE TYPE 1|Neochlamydia sp. 'turtle type 1' 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partialsequence.| ttagcgatcgtttcc... >gb|AF451294|TURTLE TYPE 1|Chlamydophila abortus isolate turtle type 1 16S ribosomal RNA gene,partial sequence.| acggaataacgactt... >gb|AF451290|IGUANA TYPE 1|Chlamydophila pneumoniae isolate iguana type 1 16S ribosomal RNAgene, partial sequence.| aatgacttcggttgt... >gb|AF451289|BURMESE PYTHON TYPE 1|Chlamydophila abortus isolate burmese python type 1 16S ribosomalRNA gene, partial sequence.| atagcttcggttatt...
23S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|X87293|BIOTYPE 1 ATCC 27562 T|V.vulnificus 23S rRNA gene, biotype 1.| ggttaagtgactaag...
Miscellaneous Sequence Data: >gb|AJ300551|CIP 5731T| ATCC 13337T| BIOTYPE 1|Hafnia alvei partial gyrB gene for DNA gyrase B subunit strain CIP5731T, ATCC 13337T, Biotype 1.| ataagtttgatgaca...
Bibliography: CARPENTER P L 1944 J BACT 47 219
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 95493
Author(s): Bootsma,H.J.;van der Heide,H.G.;van de Pas,S.;Schouls,L.M.;Mooi,F.R.
Journal: J Infect Dis
Title: Analysis of Moraxella catarrhalis by DNA typing: evidence for a distinct subpopulation associated with virulence traits
Volume: 181
Page(s): 1376-87
Year: 2000
Keyword(s): Adult Antigens, Bacterial/genetics Antigens, Surface/genetics Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/genetics Base Sequence Carrier State Child Humans Laryngitis/microbiology Lung Diseases, Obstructive/genetics/microbiology Molecular Sequence Data Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis/classification/*genetics/*pathogenicity Neisseriaceae Infections/genetics/microbiology Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology
Remarks: Two DNA typing methods, probe-generated restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and single-adapter amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, were used to study the genetic relationships among 90 Moraxella catarrhalis strains. Both methods were found to be highly concordant, generating a dendrogram with 2 main branches. The division of the M. catarrhalis population into 2 subspecies was supported by analysis of the 16S rRNA sequences. Both beta-lactamase-positive and beta-lactamase-negative strains were found in all main branches, suggesting horizontal transfer of the beta-lactamase gene. In contrast, 2 virulence traits, complement resistance and adherence to epithelial cells, were strongly associated with 1 of the 2 subspecies. The branch depth suggested that complement-resistant adherent strains diverged from a common ancestor more recently than did complement-sensitive nonadherent strains. These findings suggest the existence of subpopulations of M. catarrhalis that differ in virulence, and they may have implications for vaccine development.
URL: 10762569
Ref #: 48709
Author(s): Dauga,C.
Journal: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol
Title: Evolution of the gyrB gene and the molecular phylogeny of Enterobacteriaceae: a model molecule for molecular systematic studies
Volume: 52
Page(s): 531-47
Year: 2002
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AJ300528 GENBANK/AJ300529 GENBANK/AJ300530 GENBANK/AJ300531 GENBANK/AJ300532 GENBANK/AJ300533 GENBANK/AJ300534 GENBANK/AJ300535 GENBANK/AJ300536 GENBANK/AJ300537 GENBANK/AJ300538 GENBANK/AJ300539 GENBANK/AJ300540 GENBANK/AJ300541 GENBANK/AJ300542 GENBANK/AJ300543 GENBANK/AJ300544 GENBANK/AJ300545 GENBANK/AJ300546 GENBANK/AJ300547 GENBANK/AJ300548 GENBANK/AJ300549 GENBANK/AJ300550 GENBANK/AJ300551 GENBANK/AJ300552 GENBANK/AJ300553 GENBANK/AJ300554 DNA Gyrase/*genetics Enterobacteriaceae/*classification/genetics Evolution, Molecular Genes, rRNA Molecular Sequence Data Phenotype RNA, Bacterial/chemistry RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry
Remarks: Phylogenetic trees showing the evolutionary relatedness of Enterobacteriaceae based upon gyrB and 16S rRNA genes were compared. Congruence among trees of these molecules indicates that the genomes of these species are not completely mosaic and that molecular systematic studies can be carried out. Phylogenetic trees based on gyrB sequences appeared to be more reliable at determining relationships among Serratia species than trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. gyrB sequences from Serratia species formed a monophyletic group validated by significant bootstrap values. Serratia fonticola had the most deeply branching gyrB sequence in the Serratia monophyletic group, which was consistent with its atypical phenotypic characteristics. Klebsiella and Enterobacter genera seemed to be polyphyletic, but the branching patterns of gyrB and 16S rRNA gene trees were not congruent. Enterobacter aerogenes was grouped with Klebsiella pneumoniae on the gyrB phylogenetic tree, which supports that this species could be transferred to the Klebsiella genus. Unfortunately, 16S rRNA and gyrB phylogenetic trees gave conflicting evolutionary relationships for Citrobacter freundii because of its unusual gyrB evolutionary process. gyrB lateral gene transfer was suspected for Hafnia alvei. Saturation of gyrB genes was observed by the pairwise comparison of Proteus spp., Providencia alcalifaciens and Morganella morganii sequences. Depending on their level of variability, 16S rRNA gene sequences were useful for describing phylogenetic relationships between distantly related Enterobacteriaceae, whereas gyrB sequence comparison was useful for inferring intra- and some intergeneric relationships.
URL: 11931166
Ref #: 95457
Author(s): Bodetti,T.J.;Jacobson,E.;Wan,C.;Hafner,L.;Pospischil,A.;Rose,K.;Timms,P.
Journal: Syst Appl Microbiol
Title: Molecular evidence to support the expansion of the hostrange of Chlamydophila pneumoniae to include reptiles as well as humans, horses, koalas and amphibians
Volume: 25
Page(s): 146-52
Year: 2002
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AY026515 GENBANK/AY026516 GENBANK/AY026517 GENBANK/AY026518 GENBANK/AY026519 GENBANK/AY026520 Amphibia/*microbiology Animals Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/chemistry Chlamydophila Infections/diagnosis/microbiology Chlamydophila pneumoniae/classification/*genetics/*isolation & purification Disease Reservoirs Horses/microbiology Humans Immunohistochemistry Marsupialia/microbiology Molecular Sequence Data Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods RNA, Bacterial/analysis RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/analysis Reptiles/classification/*microbiology Sensitivity and Specificity Sequence Analysis, DNA Species Specificity
Remarks: The Chlamydiales are a family of unique intracellular pathogens that cause significant disease in humans, birds and a wide range of animal hosts. Of the currently recognized species, Chlamydophila (previously Chlamydia) pneumoniae, unlike the other chlamydial species, has been previously considered to be solely a pathogen of humans, causing significant respiratory disease and has also been strongly connected with cardiovascular disease. Here we report the finding that strains of C. pneumoniae are widespread in the environment, being detected by molecular methods in a range of reptiles (snakes, iguanas, chameleons) and amphibians (frogs, turtles). Of particular interest was the finding that genotyping of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein gene in these newly identified C. pneumoniae strains showed that many were genetically very similar, if not identical to the human respiratory strains. Whether these reptilian and amphibian strains of C. pneumoniae are still capable of infecting humans, or crossed the host barrier some time ago, remains to be determined but may provide further insights into the relationship of this common respiratory infection with its human host.
URL: 12086181
Ref #: 13696
Author(s): Bootsma,H.J.;van der Heide,H.G.;van de Pas,S.;Schouls,L.M.;Mooi,F.R.
Journal: J Infect Dis
Title: Analysis of Moraxella catarrhalis by DNA typing: evidence for a distinct subpopulation associated with virulence traits
Volume: 181
Page(s): 1376-87
Year: 2000
Keyword(s): Adult Antigens, Bacterial/genetics Antigens, Surface/genetics Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/genetics Base Sequence Carrier State Child Human Laryngitis/microbiology Lung Diseases, Obstructive/genetics/microbiology Molecular Sequence Data Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis/classification/*genetics/*pathogenicity Neisseriaceae Infections/genetics/microbiology Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Remarks: Two DNA typing methods, probe-generated restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and single-adapter amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, were used to study the genetic relationships among 90 Moraxella catarrhalis strains. Both methods were found to be highly concordant, generating a dendrogram with 2 main branches. The division of the M. catarrhalis population into 2 subspecies was supported by analysis of the 16S rRNA sequences. Both beta-lactamase-positive and beta-lactamase-negative strains were found in all main branches, suggesting horizontal transfer of the beta-lactamase gene. In contrast, 2 virulence traits, complement resistance and adherence to epithelial cells, were strongly associated with 1 of the 2 subspecies. The branch depth suggested that complement-resistant adherent strains diverged from a common ancestor more recently than did complement-sensitive nonadherent strains. These findings suggest the existence of subpopulations of M. catarrhalis that differ in virulence, and they may have implications for vaccine development.
URL: 20227761
Data: F. L. Mickle, Connecticut in 1949 / E. coli serotype 04:K:H- / Type 1 / Carpenter, P. L. (1944) J. Bact. 47, 219
Accession Date: 01/01/1949
History: CONNECTICUT
Depositor: MICKLE F L
Taxonomy: TaxLink: ? (NCTC 7921) - Date of change: 04/02/2003
Biosafety Responsibility: It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country

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