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Bacteria and Mycoplasmas detail

Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety





Bacteria Collection: Streptococcus intermedius

NCTC Number: NCTC 11324
Current Name: Streptococcus intermedius
Original Strain Reference: VPI 3372A, Prevot 1877
Other Collection No: ATCC 27335; PREVOT 1877; VPI 3372A
Previous Catalogue Name: Streptococcus intermedius
Type Strain: Yes
Family: Streptococcaceae
Hazard Group (ACDP): 2
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Conditions for growth on solid media: Columbia blood agar, 24-48 hours, 37°C, anaerobic
Conditions for growth on liquid media: nutrient broth,37, facultative anaerobe
Whole Genome Sequence: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/ERS1183437
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|X58311|NCTC 11324|S.intermedius 16S rRNA.| gaacgggtgagtnac... >gb|AF104671|ATCC27335|Streptococcus intermedius strain ATCC27335 16S ribosomal RNA gene,partial sequence.| tttgatcctggttca... >gb|U02916|ATCC 27335|Streptococcus intermedius ATCC 27335 16S rRNA gene, partialsequence.| gcgcaacccttattg... >gb|Z69040|ATCC 27335|S.intermedius 16S ribosomal RNA.| tagaacgcacaggat... >gb|AY347549|ATCC 27335|Streptococcus intermedius strain ATCC 27335 16S-23S ribosomal RNAintergenic spacer, complete sequence.| ctaaggaaaatacgg...
23S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AY347549|ATCC 27335|Streptococcus intermedius strain ATCC 27335 16S-23S ribosomal RNAintergenic spacer, complete sequence.| ctaaggaaaatacgg...
Bibliography: HOLDEMANN L V & MOORE W E C 1974 INT J SYST BACT 24 260
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 95509
Author(s): Majewski,J.;Zawadzki,P.;Pickerill,P.;Cohan,F.M.;Dowson,C.G.
Journal: J Bacteriol
Title: Barriers to genetic exchange between bacterial species: Streptococcus pneumoniae transformation
Volume: 182
Page(s): 1016-23
Year: 2000
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AF194507 GENBANK/AF194508 GENBANK/AF194509 GENBANK/AF194510 GENBANK/AF194511 GENBANK/AF194512 GENBANK/AF194513 GENBANK/AF194514 GENBANK/AF194515 GENBANK/AF194516 GENBANK/AF194517 GENBANK/AF194518 GENBANK/AF194519 GENBANK/AF194520 GENBANK/AF194521 GENBANK/AF194522 GENBANK/AF194523 GENBANK/AF194524 GENBANK/AF194525 GENBANK/AF194526 GENBANK/AF194527 GENBANK/AF194528 Base Pair Mismatch/*genetics DNA Repair/*genetics DNA, Bacterial/genetics DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/genetics Molecular Sequence Data Phylogeny Recombination, Genetic Sequence Analysis, DNA Streptococcus/genetics Streptococcus pneumoniae/*genetics/growth & development *Transformation, Bacterial
Remarks: Interspecies genetic exchange is an important evolutionary mechanism in bacteria. It allows rapid acquisition of novel functions by transmission of adaptive genes between related species. However, the frequency of homologous recombination between bacterial species decreases sharply with the extent of DNA sequence divergence between the donor and the recipient. In Bacillus and Escherichia, this sexual isolation has been shown to be an exponential function of sequence divergence. Here we demonstrate that sexual isolation in transformation between Streptococcus pneumoniae recipient strains and donor DNA from related strains and species follows the described exponential relationship. We show that the Hex mismatch repair system poses a significant barrier to recombination over the entire range of sequence divergence (0.6 to 27%) investigated. Although mismatch repair becomes partially saturated, it is responsible for 34% of the observed sexual isolation. This is greater than the role of mismatch repair in Bacillus but less than that in Escherichia. The remaining non-Hex-mediated barrier to recombination can be provided by a variety of mechanisms. We discuss the possible additional mechanisms of sexual isolation, in view of earlier findings from Bacillus, Escherichia, and Streptococcus.
URL: 10648528
Ref #: 82754
Author(s): Jacobs,J.A.;Schot,C.S.;Schouls,L.M.
Journal: J Med Microbiol
Title: Haemolytic activity of the Streptococcus milleri group' and relationship between haemolysis restricted to human red blood cells and pathogenicity in S. intermedius
Volume: 49
Page(s): 55-62
Year: 2000
Keyword(s): Animals Cattle Female Genotype *Hemolysis Horses Humans Male Phenotype Phylogeny RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry/genetics Rabbits Sheep Species Specificity Streptococcus/classification/genetics/*pathogenicity Swine Variation (Genetics)
Remarks: A collection of 297 clinically documented 'Streptococcus milleri' strains, identified to the genotype level by 16S rRNA gene hydridisation, was screened for haemolysis of human and animal red blood cells. Forty-nine strains (65%) of the S. intermedius genotype displayed haemolysis restricted to human blood; they were named 'exclusive human haemolytic' (EHH) S. intermedius strains. The 26 remaining S. intermedius strains were named S. intermedius non-EHH strains. Quantitative studies on the haemolysis indicated that intermedilysin was the factor involved. The S. intermedius EHH strains represented the S. intermedius phenotype, whereas the S. intermedius non-EHH strains were phenotypically characteristic of S. constellatus. The complete 16S rRNA sequences of the S. intermedius EHH strains exhibited identity with S. intermedius strains ATCC 27335 (= NCDO 2227, NCTC 11324); the 16S rRNA sequences of the S. intermedius non-EHH strains were identical to S. constellatus strain ATCC 27823 (= NCDO 2226, NCTC 11325) except for positions 228 and 229 that carried an S. intermedius sequence signature. The 16S sequence similarities between the non-EHH strains and the S. constellatus and the S. intermedius type strains were 99.5% and 98.6%, respectively. Hybridisations of the complete 16S rRNA genes with oligonucleotide probes indicated a 16S rRNA homogeneity within the S. intermedius EHH and the non-EHH strains respectively. The S. intermedius EHH strains were isolated most frequently from infection- and abscess-related specimens. The present data emphasise the genetic variability within the S. constellatus species and redefine the S. intermedius species as a homogeneous group at the 16S rRNA level.
URL: 10628826
Ref #: 82396
Author(s): Bentley,R.W.;Leigh,J.A.;Collins,M.D.
Journal: Int J Syst Bacteriol
Title: Intrageneric structure of Streptococcus based on comparative analysis of small-subunit rRNA sequences
Volume: 41
Page(s): 487-94
Year: 1992
Keyword(s): GENBANK/S70322 GENBANK/S70323 GENBANK/S70324 GENBANK/X58301 GENBANK/X58302 GENBANK/X58303 GENBANK/X58304 GENBANK/X58305 GENBANK/X58306 GENBANK/X58307 GENBANK/X58308 GENBANK/X58309 GENBANK/X58310 GENBANK/X58311 GENBANK/X58312 GENBANK/X58313 GENBANK/X58314 GENBANK/X58315 GENBANK/X58316 GENBANK/X58317 GENBANK/X58318 GENBANK/X58319 GENBANK/X58320 GENBANK/X58321 GENBANK/X59028 GENBANK/X59029 GENBANK/X59030 GENBANK/X59031 GENBANK/X59032 GENBANK/X59061 etc. Base Sequence DNA, Bacterial Molecular Sequence Data Phylogeny RNA, Bacterial/genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid Streptococcus/classification/*genetics
Remarks: The partial 16S rRNA sequences of 24 Streptococcus species were determined by reverse transcription. A comparative analysis of these sequences and the sequences of seven previously studied streptococcal species revealed the presence of several clusters within the genus. The clusters obtained from the sequence analysis agreed in general with the groups outlined on the basis of the results of nucleic acid hybridization studies, but there were some exceptions. The pyogenic group was extended to include Streptococcus agalactiae, S. parauberis, S. porcinus, and S. uberis. Four oral groups were discerned; these four groups centered on S. mutans, S. salivarius, S. anginosus, and S. oralis. Some species (e.g., S. suis and S. acidominimus) did not cluster with any particular group. Our findings are discussed in the context of data from other genetic and chemotaxonomic studies.
URL: 1720654
Ref #: 95486
Author(s): Jacobs,J.A.;Schot,C.S.;Bunschoten,A.E.;Schouls,L.M.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Rapid species identification of "Streptococcus milleri" strains by line blot hybridization: identification of a distinct 16S rRNA population closely related to Streptococcus constellatus
Volume: 34
Page(s): 1717-21
Year: 1996
Keyword(s): GENBANK/Z69037 GENBANK/Z69038 GENBANK/Z69040 GENBANK/Z69041 Bacterial Typing Techniques Base Sequence DNA Probes/genetics Genes, Bacterial Humans Molecular Sequence Data Nucleic Acid Hybridization Phenotype Polymerase Chain Reaction RNA, Bacterial/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Species Specificity Streptococcus/*classification/*genetics/isolation & purification
Remarks: A collection of 399 "Streptococcus milleri" strains were identified to the species level by the use of a line blot assay. Their PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were hybridized with species-specific 5'-biotinylated oligonucleotide probes homologous to the bp 213 to 231 regions of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the type strains Streptococcus anginosus ATCC 33397, Streptococcus constellatus ATCC 27823, and Streptococcus intermedius ATCC 27335. The hybridization results were compared with the reference phenotypic identification method data (R. A. Whiley, H. Fraser, J. M. Hardie, and D. Beighton, J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:1497-1501, 1990). Most strains (357 of 399 [89.5%]) reacted unambiguously with only one probe. However, 42 of the 399 strains (10.5%) reacted with both the S. constellatus- and S. intermedius-specific probes; 41 of them were phenotypically identified as S. constellatus. These dually reactive strains hybridized with a 5'-biotinylated probe based on the bp 213 to 231 region of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of one of two species. Analysis of the 5' ends of the 16S rRNA gene sequences (487 bp) demonstrated that the dually reactive strains represent a distinct rRNA population sharing 98.1% sequence similarity with S. constellatus. Phenotypic consistency between the dually reactive strains and the S. constellatus strains was not demonstrated. Line blot hybridization proved to be a simple and inexpensive method to screen large numbers of strains for genetic relatedness, and it allowed the detection of a distinct 16S rRNA type within the "S. milleri" group.
URL: 8784576
Ref #: 82554
Author(s): Chen,C.C.;Teng,L.J.;Chang,T.C.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Identification of clinically relevant viridans group streptococci by sequence analysis of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA spacer region
Volume: 42
Page(s): 2651-7
Year: 2004
Keyword(s): DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/*chemistry Humans Phylogeny Polymerase Chain Reaction RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/*genetics Sequence Analysis, DNA Viridans Streptococci/classification/genetics/*isolation & purification
Remarks: The feasibility of sequence analysis of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (ITS) for the identification of clinically relevant viridans group streptococci (VS) was evaluated. The ITS regions of 29 reference strains (11 species) of VS were amplified by PCR and sequenced. These 11 species were Streptococcus anginosus, S. constellatus, S. gordonii, S. intermedius, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. oralis, S. parasanguinis, S. salivarius, S. sanguinis, and S. uberis. The ITS lengths (246 to 391 bp) and sequences were highly conserved among strains within a species. The intraspecies similarity scores for the ITS sequences ranged from 0.98 to 1.0, except for the score for S. gordonii strains. The interspecies similarity scores for the ITS sequences varied from 0.31 to 0.93. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS regions revealed that evolution of the regions of some species of VS is not parallel to that of the 16S rRNA genes. One hundred six clinical isolates of VS were identified by the Rapid ID 32 STREP system (bioMerieux Vitek, Marcy l'Etoile, France) and by ITS sequencing, and the level of disagreement between the two methods was 18% (19 isolates). Most isolates producing discrepant results could be unambiguously assigned to a specific species by their ITS sequences. The accuracy of using ITS sequencing for identification of VS was verified by 16S rDNA sequencing for all strains except strains of S. oralis and S. mitis, which were difficult to differentiate by their 16S rDNA sequences. In conclusion, identification of species of VS by ITS sequencing is reliable and could be used as an alternative accurate method for identification of VS.
URL: 15184447
Ref #: 13410
Author(s): Jacobs,J.A.;Schot,C.S.;Bunschoten,A.E.;Schouls,L.M.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Rapid species identification of "Streptococcus milleri" strains by line blot hybridization: identification of a distinct 16S rRNA population closely related to Streptococcus constellatus
Volume: 34
Page(s): 1717-21
Year: 1996
Keyword(s): GENBANK/Z69037 GENBANK/Z69038 GENBANK/Z69040 GENBANK/Z69041 Bacterial Typing Techniques Base Sequence Comparative Study DNA Probes/genetics Genes, Bacterial Human Molecular Sequence Data Nucleic Acid Hybridization Phenotype Polymerase Chain Reaction RNA, Bacterial/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Species Specificity Streptococcus/*classification/*genetics/isolation & purification
Remarks: A collection of 399 "Streptococcus milleri" strains were identified to the species level by the use of a line blot assay. Their PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were hybridized with species-specific 5'-biotinylated oligonucleotide probes homologous to the bp 213 to 231 regions of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the type strains Streptococcus anginosus ATCC 33397, Streptococcus constellatus ATCC 27823, and Streptococcus intermedius ATCC 27335. The hybridization results were compared with the reference phenotypic identification method data (R. A. Whiley, H. Fraser, J. M. Hardie, and D. Beighton, J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:1497-1501, 1990). Most strains (357 of 399 [89.5%]) reacted unambiguously with only one probe. However, 42 of the 399 strains (10.5%) reacted with both the S. constellatus- and S. intermedius-specific probes; 41 of them were phenotypically identified as S. constellatus. These dually reactive strains hybridized with a 5'-biotinylated probe based on the bp 213 to 231 region of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of one of two species. Analysis of the 5' ends of the 16S rRNA gene sequences (487 bp) demonstrated that the dually reactive strains represent a distinct rRNA population sharing 98.1% sequence similarity with S. constellatus. Phenotypic consistency between the dually reactive strains and the S. constellatus strains was not demonstrated. Line blot hybridization proved to be a simple and inexpensive method to screen large numbers of strains for genetic relatedness, and it allowed the detection of a distinct 16S rRNA type within the "S. milleri" group.
URL: 96379013
Ref #: 13687
Author(s): Greisen,K.;Loeffelholz,M.;Purohit,A.;Leong,D.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: PCR primers and probes for the 16S rRNA gene of most species of pathogenic
Volume: 32
Page(s): 335-351
Year: 1994
Keyword(s): 0 (DNA Primers) 0 (DNA Probes) 0 (RNA, Bacterial) 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S) Bacteremia/diagnosis/microbiology Bacteria/*genetics/isolation & purification/pathogenicity Bacterial Infections/diagnosis/microbiology Base Sequence Cerebrospinal Fluid/microbiology DNA Primers/genetics DNA Probes/genetics Genes, Bacterial Gram-Negative Bacteria/genetics Gram-Positive Bacteria/genetics Human Meningitis, Bacterial/diagnosis/microbiology Molecular Sequence Data Nucleic Acid Hybridization *Polymerase Chain Reaction/statistics & numerical data RNA, Bacterial/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Sensitivity and Specificity Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid Species Specificity
Remarks: A set of broad-range PCR primers for the 16S rRNA gene in bacteria were
URL: 94201356
Ref #: 13390
Author(s): Jacobs,J.A.;Schot,C.S.;Schouls,L.M.
Journal: J Med Microbiol
Title: Haemolytic activity of the Streptococcus milleri group' and relationship between haemolysis restricted to human red blood cells and pathogenicity in S. intermedius
Volume: 49
Page(s): 55-62
Year: 2000
Keyword(s): Animal Cattle Female Genotype *Hemolysis Horses Human Male Phenotype Phylogeny RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry/genetics Rabbits Sheep Species Specificity Streptococcus/classification/genetics/*pathogenicity Swine Variation (Genetics)
Remarks: A collection of 297 clinically documented 'Streptococcus milleri' strains, identified to the genotype level by 16S rRNA gene hydridisation, was screened for haemolysis of human and animal red blood cells. Forty-nine strains (65%) of the S. intermedius genotype displayed haemolysis restricted to human blood; they were named 'exclusive human haemolytic' (EHH) S. intermedius strains. The 26 remaining S. intermedius strains were named S. intermedius non-EHH strains. Quantitative studies on the haemolysis indicated that intermedilysin was the factor involved. The S. intermedius EHH strains represented the S. intermedius phenotype, whereas the S. intermedius non-EHH strains were phenotypically characteristic of S. constellatus. The complete 16S rRNA sequences of the S. intermedius EHH strains exhibited identity with S. intermedius strains ATCC 27335 (= NCDO 2227, NCTC 11324); the 16S rRNA sequences of the S. intermedius non-EHH strains were identical to S. constellatus strain ATCC 27823 (= NCDO 2226, NCTC 11325) except for positions 228 and 229 that carried an S. intermedius sequence signature. The 16S sequence similarities between the non-EHH strains and the S. constellatus and the S. intermedius type strains were 99.5% and 98.6%, respectively. Hybridisations of the complete 16S rRNA genes with oligonucleotide probes indicated a 16S rRNA homogeneity within the S. intermedius EHH and the non-EHH strains respectively. The S. intermedius EHH strains were isolated most frequently from infection- and abscess-related specimens. The present data emphasise the genetic variability within the S. constellatus species and redefine the S. intermedius species as a homogeneous group at the 16S rRNA level.
URL: 20092448
Ref #: 13387
Author(s): Bentley,R.W.;Leigh,J.A.;Collins,M.D.
Journal: Int J Syst Bacteriol
Title: Intrageneric structure of Streptococcus based on comparative analysis of small-subunit rRNA sequences
Volume: 41
Page(s): 487-94
Year: 1992
Keyword(s): GENBANK/S70322 GENBANK/S70323 GENBANK/S70324 GENBANK/X58301 GENBANK/X58302 GENBANK/X58303 GENBANK/X58304 GENBANK/X58305 GENBANK/X58306 GENBANK/X58307 GENBANK/X58308 GENBANK/X58309 GENBANK/X58310 GENBANK/X58311 GENBANK/X58312 GENBANK/X58313 GENBANK/X58314 GENBANK/X58315 GENBANK/X58316 GENBANK/X58317 GENBANK/X58318 GENBANK/X58319 GENBANK/X58320 GENBANK/X58321 GENBANK/X59028 GENBANK/X59029 GENBANK/X59030 GENBANK/X59031 GENBANK/X59032 GENBANK/X59061 etc. Base Sequence DNA, Bacterial Molecular Sequence Data Phylogeny RNA, Bacterial/genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid Streptococcus/classification/*genetics Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Remarks: The partial 16S rRNA sequences of 24 Streptococcus species were determined by reverse transcription. A comparative analysis of these sequences and the sequences of seven previously studied streptococcal species revealed the presence of several clusters within the genus. The clusters obtained from the sequence analysis agreed in general with the groups outlined on the basis of the results of nucleic acid hybridization studies, but there were some exceptions. The pyogenic group was extended to include Streptococcus agalactiae, S. parauberis, S. porcinus, and S. uberis. Four oral groups were discerned; these four groups centered on S. mutans, S. salivarius, S. anginosus, and S. oralis. Some species (e.g., S. suis and S. acidominimus) did not cluster with any particular group. Our findings are discussed in the context of data from other genetic and chemotaxonomic studies.
URL: 92075550
Data: (ATCC 27335, NCDO 2227) Type strain / ATCC in 1979 / W. E. C. Moore, VPI / A. Prevot, Paris / Holdeman, L. V. & Moore, W. E. C. (1974) Int. J. syst. Bact. 24, 260 / Whiley, R. A. & Beighton, D. (1991) Int. J. syst. Bact. 41, 1
Accession Date: 01/01/1979
History: ISOLATED BY PREVOT A - MOORE W E C VPI - GHERNA R L ATCC PRE:FR
Authority: Prévot 1925 emend. Whiley and Beighton 1991
Depositor: ATCC
Taxonomy: TaxLink: S2847 (Streptococcus intermedius Prévot 1925 emend. Whiley and Beighton 1991) - Date of change: 5/02/2003
Biosafety Responsibility: It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country

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